Eisai forecasts growth in revenue, profit for fiscal year 2019 as Lenvima sales more than double in Q4

Headline results for the fourth quarter:

Revenue

175.6 billion Japanese yen ($1.6 billion)

Versus 160.1 billion yen ($1.5 billion)

Profit

22.7 billion yen ($207 million)

Versus 23.8 billion yen ($217 million)

Note: All changes are versus the prior-year period unless otherwise stated

What the company said:

Eisai noted that sales were boosted by "significant growth" for Lenvima following approval for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as "steady growth" for Humira and Fycompa. The company indicated that these absorbed the impact of drug pricing revision in Japan, as well as the return of marketing rights for Aloxi in the US.

Other results:

  • Lenvima: 19.2 billion yen ($175 million), up from 8.8 billion yen ($80 million) in the prior year
  • Halaven: 10 billion yen ($91 million), up from 9.3 billion yen ($85 million) in the prior year
  • Fycompa: 4.9 billion yen ($45 million), up from 4.1 billion yen ($37 million) in the prior year
  • Belviq: 1.6 billion yen ($15 million), up from 1.1 billion yen ($10 million) in the prior year
  • Full-year revenue: 642.8 billion yen ($5.9 billion), up 7.1 percent
  • Full-year profit: 66.5 billion yen ($609 million), up 22.2 percent

Looking ahead:

Eisai expects sales in fiscal year 2019 of 680 billion yen ($6.2 billion), representing year-on-year growth of 5.8 percent, with profit forecast to increase 9 percent to 72.5 billion yen ($664 million). The company noted that annual sales of Lenvima are expected to jump 85.4 percent to 116 billion yen ($1.1 billion), with revenue from Halaven and Fycompa reaching 43 billion yen ($394 million) and 25 billion yen ($229 million), respectively.

Pipeline update:

Eisai disclosed that during the quarter, development of Livact for hypoalbuminaemia was discontinued at the Phase III stage in China, while mid-stage work on the anti-fractalkine antibody E6011 for primary biliary cholangitis in Japan has also been halted.

To read more Top Story articles, click here.